Economic and Human Rights :


WESPAC promotes Economic Justice through promoting fair trade year round and helping to organize the annual Margaret Eberle Fair Trade Festival in White Plains. We also partner with the Wassaic Community Farm CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) WESPAC is an active member of the Hudson Valley Fair Economy Coalition that meets monthly at the Union Hall in Port Chester, and we have taken a lead role in promoting a public bank for the State of New York. To get involved, please contact the office at 914.449.6514 or by email at [email protected]

Westchester Social Justice Forum 2018!

For all details please visit:

Separate and Unequal

Good Food Farmers

Hi Nada,

Thank you for helping to spread the word about Good Food Farmers – we really appreciate it!
Please feel free to be in touch with any questions!
Many thanks, 

Good Food Farmers Network is comprised of small-scale and beginning farmers anchored by more experienced growers committed to regenerative agriculture. We work hard to produce and deliver the best quality foods grown with the highest standards of care for the earth and all who inhabit it. We welcome your support and the opportunity to grow food for you!
A few Good Food Farmers highlights: 
  • We are farmer-owned and farmer-led – a farmer cooperative in essence but not quite structured that way yet – all purchases directly support our farms. 
  • Our commitment to producing and delivering good food is unwavering. All our foods are incredibly fresh, grown and harvested with great care, and produced without pesticideswithout synthetic fertilizerswithout genetically modified organisms, and with the highest degree of animal welfare and environmental stewardship
  • You pay by the week (there’s a $45 order minimum to help make sure we’re covering our delivery costs), and you can cancel if needed. 
  • You can put your delivery on hold anytime, whether you’re going out of town or simply feel overwhelmed by the bounty of the seasons. 
  • When you sign up, you pick a Farmer’s Choice default bag. Each week, we choose items for the default bags based on what’s looking good in the fields. We announce the items in the Weekly e-Newsletter sent out on Fridays each week. If you do nothing, you will receive the default bag. But, you can also log-in to your online account and completely customize your order if desired. We have 35+ items available each week during the winter months and 65+ items during the main growing season, so there’s lots of flexibility to build a bag that suits you. About half of our members choose to customize, and about half choose to get the default bag, often remarking that they like the mix of seasonal items and don’t want to bother customizing. Either way, it’s up to you! The order deadline for holds and customizing is Sunday nights at 11:59 pm.
  • We deliver to Mt. Kisco each week with pickup at the Khader Center available each Wednesday from 10 am to 6 pm. We also offer home and office delivery in some parts of lower Westchester from Pelham to White Plains and neighborhoods in between. 
  • For more details, feel free to visit our GFF website.
  • To join, you can go directly to the GFF online store.
  • You can also check out our Crop Plan (pdf) to get a sense for what we offer throughout the year, though crop plans are always subject to weather, pests, and other farming factors!
Thank you for your interest, and we are happy to answer any questions whether technical or simply to learn more about us and all of our farms. Please feel free to be in touch! 
– Hilary, on behalf of all your Good Food Farmers
Hilary Corsun
Dog Wood Farm 
& GFF Coordinator
518-821-4282 farm office
c/o Dog Wood Farm, 85 Hartigan Road, Old Chatham, NY 12136
Good Food Farmers is farmer-owned and works to support sustainable agriculture and small-scale and beginning farmers by delivering good food into the hands of more people. 

Information to inform ICE out of the Courts advocacy

New York’s top prosecutors, public defenders and advocates are rightly speaking out against a pernicious Trump administration policy that encourages Immigration and Customs Enforcement officers to roam the halls of state courthouses with the goal of targeting and arresting immigrants attending to official court business.

As documented by the Immigrant Defense Project, there was a 1,100% increase in incidence of ICE courthouse arrests in New York in 2017 from the previous year.

Immigrants are now afraid to attend court in any capacity — as defendants, plaintiffs, witnesses, victims or supportive family members. This impedes justice.

New York is not helpless in the face of President Trump’s harsh immigration enforcement machine. We believe that courthouse arrests are not only bad policy — they are also unconstitutional. Therefore, we urge the state’s top judicial official, Chief Judge Janet DiFiore, and the Office of Court Administration she leads to immediately adopt rules to restrict these civil arrests in New York’s courthouses.

“Everyone, regardless of their immigration status or the status of their loved ones, should have access to equal justice under the law,” state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said in speaking out against courthouse arrests.

It’s not a platitude. The principle that equal justice requires access to court dates back to 18th century common law, which barred civil arrests for people attending court. In more recent iterations, the Supreme Court has recognized that the Constitution requires that “access to the courts is adequate, effective and meaningful.”

ICE’s policy of intimidation in effect closes the courthouse doors to immigrants. This not only tramples their rights — the Constitution isn’t only for citizens — but also infringes on the rights of people who may require immigrant witnesses in court to effectively present their cases.

 Federal immigration enforcement officials claim that courthouse arrests are necessary for safety and efficiency, but this reflects a shortsighted view of what public safety means. The reality is that when immigrants are afraid to show up in court, our city becomes less safe.

New York City is home to 3.3 million immigrants, who, even if they have legal status, may fear the presence of ICE officers.

Our courts cannot function when 40% of our population believes that if they show up, they may suddenly be dragged off in handcuffs to face unrelated deportation proceedings.

New York must no longer let its justice system be used as a hunting ground. State courts throughout the nation, including in New York, routinely implement rules to ensure order and access to justice for litigants and witnesses. New York should implement rules like those proposed by the Immigrant Defense Project and others, which would flatly prohibit civil arrests in the courthouse unless the arresting officer has a judicial warrant or order, and prevent court resources from being used to assist ICE.

Rules like these are important, timely uses of courts’ longstanding authority to regulate judicial spaces. While the public nature of the courthouses is often held as sacrosanct, this has never meant that those who visit them are free from regulation. On the contrary, the New York State Court of Appeals has repeatedly recognized “the inherent power of the court to preserve order and decorum in the courtroom, to protect the rights of parties and witnesses, and generally to further the administration of justice.”

New York courts have accordingly upheld rules restricting the courthouse presence of bail bondsmen, the press and even the general public when necessary to prevent interference with proceedings and prejudice to litigants. The disruption and chilling effect of courthouse arrests surely meets the same standard.

The fact that a rule restricting civil arrests in courthouses would apply to a law enforcement agency, and a federal one at that, does nothing to diminish New York courts’ authority in this respect. In fact, many courts have adopted rules, such as restrictions on carrying firearms, that regulate law enforcement officers’ conduct within courthouses.

As long as ICE threatens the sanctity of our state courthouses, New York has an obligation to push back — to ensure meaningful access to justice for all those who may have concerns about their immigration status, but rely on our courts to vindicate their rights to protection, child custody, housing and a fair defense in criminal proceedings.

Ultimately, New York not only has the authority to prevent this threat to the administration of justice in its courts, it has a duty to do so for the many New Yorkers who depend on them.

Morawetz is a professor of clinical law at NYU School of Law. Nash is a visiting assistant clinical professor of law at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Employee Earned Sick Time in Westchester



Does this sound familiar?  You’re in line at a coffee shop waiting for your order and the sever working behind the counter is coughing and wiping a runny nose and you think to yourself “Great, now I’m going to get sick, why doesn’t this person just stay home”.    Well, it’s likely, because they are one of the 36% of Westchester workers that don’t have employer paid sick leave.  

When so many workers in Westchester don’t have paid sick leave they: come to work sick, send their children to school sick, and ultimately increase the chances of getting us all sick.   In 2018, we can change that by supporting a new law proposed by the Westchester County Legislators that provides Employee Earned Sick Time for workers.   New York City has already passed such a law and has seen many benefits to workers, employers and the community.

You’re invited to take part in a People’s Town Hall to learn, discuss and comment on the benefits and challenges in passing: Employee Earned sick Time in Westchester NY.    

Who: WESPAC & the Community/Labor Coalition for Employee Earned Sick Time

What:   The People’s Town Hall – Subject Matter Experts, a Panel made up of Community, Labor, Education, Healthcare & Small Business, Elected Public Servants, & the Community.

Where: Yonkers Riverfront Library

When: Jan 16th Tuesday 2017, 5:30pm – 7:15pm

RSVP- Joe Mayhew cell 914-374-6848 email [email protected]

Supporters for the Westchester County Employee Earned Sick Time Law

Congregation B’nai Yisrael, CWA Local 1103, Encephalitis Global, Inc, Ethical Culture Society of Westchester, Irvington Activists, Local 1 IUEC, Lower Hudson Valley Progressive Action Network, Mamaroneck High School Young Democrats, New York County Democratic Committee, New York State Nurses Assoc, Safe Energy Rights Group, Inc., Sustainable Port Chester Alliance, Transit Workers Union, WESPAC, Westchester for Change, Westchester National Organization for Women, Westchester/Putnam Central Labor Body, Westchester-Putnam Working Families Party

Report Back from Annual NACOLE Conference

Nada will be presenting a report on Thursday, September 28th at 7pm at WESPAC regarding her participation at the Annual NACOLE Conference on behalf of WCPR.  

On September 10th, hundreds of members of law enforcement, community leaders, elected officials, journalists, academics, students and oversight professionals will gather in Spokane, Washington, for the annual four day NACOLE conference (National Association for Civilian Oversight of Law Enforcement): .

Conference attendees will be able to choose from 31 different concurrent and plenary sessions on a wide range of topics including Building Community Trust, Trauma Informed Policing, Auditing for Accountability, Evaluating Police Use of Force and much more.  Attendees will be part of a learning and networking event that will provide inspiration, ideas and practical knowledge as we work for a vision of implementing best practices and enhanced police legitimacy in our local communities and around the nation.  

Justice Monday continues at 5pm, Monday, June 5th

From Westchester for Change:

June Brings Action and Activity

Justice Monday Reboot

On Monday, June 5, the Westchester Social Justice Community will gather at Renaissance Plaza at the corner of Main St. and Mamaroneck Avenue in White Plains to support single payer healthcare in New York. The New York State Assembly passed bill A4738 (single- payer healthcare) overwhelmingly. We all must contact members of the New York State Senate to ask them to support bill S4840 and bring it to the floor for a vote. The bills, essentially Medicare for all, will protect New Yorkers from Trumpcare, which will devastate the health and well-being of millions of people. The House of Representatives passed a bill that will throw millions off healthcare, penalize people with preexisting conditions and put a lifetime cap on insurance. Bring signs ( no poles).

When: Monday, June 5, NEW TIME; 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Where: Renaissance Plaza corner of Mamaroneck Avenue and Main Street
White Plains

Note New Time for Justice Monday Rallies

The next Justice Monday rally on June 5th and all rallies in June, July and August will take place at Renaissance Plaza in White Plains at 5 p.m.

Healthcare Call-in Day

Statewide Call in Day for single payer Health Care.To get more information go to

When: June 2nd

Investing with our values

The WESPAC Board is proud to have a modest investment fund with AJF Financial Services in socially and environmentally responsible investments, including the Calvert Foundation: .  
On Monday, June 19th at 12 noon, WESPAC will host Kevin Egolf, the co-founder and manager of Local Farms Fund, an impact investment fund that supports early-stage farmers in NY with secure land access.  Please see document attached.  It is an opportunity to invest in our future and promote local job growth and sustainable local food production.  His presentation is open to the public but please RSVP.
RSVPs required at [email protected].   Our office location is 31 Mamaroneck Avenue on the fourth floor in downtown White Plains (inside the Arts Westchester building) at the corner with Martine Ave.

Please sign statement in support of Palestinian Prisoners on the 37th day of their hunger strike

Please sign statement in support of Palestinian Prisoners on the 36th day of their hunger strike:


Statement in Support of Paid Sick Leave

Please sign statement in support of paid sick leave for all Westchester County workers: